Apple iPhones Vastly More Reliable Than Samsung, Nokia or Motorola Phones

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Apple’s iPhones are roughly three times more reliable than Samsung’s line of Galaxy phones, five times more reliable than Nokia Lumia phones, and 25 times more reliable than Motorola phones, according to a recent study by product support website FixYa.

FixYa’s report only compared Apple, Samsung, Nokia, and Motorola, but composed its data by analyzing over 722,000 problem reports from its site and combining them with phone manufacturer market share data from info tracking site StatCounter. If an OEM had fewer problems reported relative to its market share, FixYa would give it a higher “Smartphone Reliability Score.”

When all the data was tallied up, Apple finished with a reliability score of 3.47, while Samsung came in second with 1.21. Nokia was third with a score of 0.68, while Motorola came in a distant fourth with a score of 0.13.

FixYa’s full breakdown can be seen on its website.

Owner’s Complaints

The report still notes that users of all these products have their own share of pet peeves. The study found that the leading complaint from Apple users had to do with the iPhone’s battery life, while Galaxy phone users generally had the most issues with their phones’ microphones and speakers. Nokia owners cite lag as their phones’ biggest dilemma, and Motorola folks have reportedly had problems with excessive crapware and subpar touchscreens.

Of course, 722,000 complaints on FixYa don’t represent everybody, but the study may give a good idea of which OEM’s customers are more likely to rush to the internet to voice their smartphone complaints. It also indicates which kind of issues are plaguing particular manufacturers, which could give future phone consumers an idea of what to expect when picking up a new handset.

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